Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Character Interview: Sadie from Paulita Kincer's 'Paris Runaway'




We’re thrilled to be talking to Sadie from Paulita Kincer’s, Paris Runaway.  It is a pleasure to have her with us today at Pimp That Character!

Thank you for your interview, Sadie.  How old are you and what do you do for a living?

Today is my 50th birthday. I teach elementary school art. Those tiny kids are such a relief compared to teenagers.

Do you have children?

I have two daughters. Evangeline, 19, just finished her first year of college at Tulane. She’s staying there this summer to take classes.
Scarlett is 17. I planned to spend the summer with her, but she surprised me by going to stay with her dad for two weeks on the first day of summer break. I haven’t heard from her yet today, even though it’s my birthday. I hope she didn’t break her phone.

Can you tell us about one of your most distinguishable features?

My hair definitely stands out – a brassy red, sometimes kindly described as copper.

What would I love the most about you?

I think you’d admire how devoted I am to my daughters. I don’t really ask a lot for myself, but I’m a Mama bear when it comes to defending them.

What would I hate the most about you?

Maybe the same thing that you love. My friends are getting tired of seeing me put my life on hold while I raise my daughters. They think I’m wasting years waiting for my kids to grow up, but one of their parents needs to put them first.

What is in your refrigerator right now?

Low fat milk – for cereal – the easiest meal possible when I don’t have to cook for anyone, and leftover Chinese that was delivered last night. I’ll have to go to the grocery store before my girls get home.

What is your greatest fear?

The thing I fear most is letting my daughters down. As a single mom, I try to put them first, but I’m so afraid of messing up that sometimes I just freeze. Other times, I try to make them happy, so I overindulge them, trying to buy their love, almost, but I know they love me.

Are you a loner or do you prefer to surround yourself with friends?

Ever since the divorce, I’ve been a loner. I avoid hanging out with my happily married friends because people are always trying to fix me up with their friends or encourage me to date. I tell my friends that I have two more years to raise my girls and then I can think about doing something for myself.

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

I always dreamed of being an artist. From the time I could hold a crayon, I’ve been creating art. Pastels were my favorite, mixing the chalky colors together, but they’ve kind of fallen out of popularity. I never tried to earn a living on my art. I figured I’d better be a teacher and then I could spend the entire summer on my art. I’m not sure where the time goes, but I don’t mind teaching art to young children. They’re usually enthusiastic.

What is your most treasured possession?

Other than my daughters, of course, I’d have to say my cat is most important. Since I spend a lot of evenings home alone, he gives me silent companionship.

About the Author


Paulita Kincer has an M.A. in journalism from American University. She has traveled to France 11 times, and still finds more to lure her back.

She currently teaches college English and lives in Columbus, Ohio, with her three children, two cats and one husband.

Her latest book is the women’s fiction, Paris Runaway.
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About the Book:


When divorced mom Sadie Ford realizes her 17-year-old daughter Scarlett has run away to Paris all she can imagine are terrorist bombings and sex slaves. After learning her daughter chased a French exchange student home, Sadie hops on the next plane in pursuit. She joins forces with the boy’s father, Auguste, and the two attempt to find the missing teens. The chase takes Sadie and Auguste to the seedier side of Marseille, where their own connection is ignited. Since the divorce, Sadie has devoted herself to raising kids and putting her dreams on hold, but when her daughter needs her most, Sadie finds that concrete barrier to life beginning to crack. In her journey, she learns the difference between watching the hours pass and living.

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